Mozart establishes himself in Vienna

The first years of Mozart in Vienna – Wolfgang Amadeus as a successful concert pianist

Original poster for Mozart's opera "The Marriage of Figaro" premiered at the Imperial Court Theatre in Vienna on 1 May 1786

1786 Source: Wikimedia
1783-1784
Wien
Mozart lived near St. Stephen's Cathedral from 1784 to 1787, where the only still existing Viennese apartment used by Mozart is located – here he composed the opera

Mozart lived near St. Stephen's Cathedral from 1784 to 1787, where the only still existing Viennese apartment used by Mozart is located – here he composed the opera "The Marriage of Figaro"

Source: Wikimedia

The newly-wed Mozarts were happy. There was always something going on in their new household. Students came and went, the Mozarts played cards or billiards, there were house balls, and two dogs and singing birds added to the merry chaos. Wolfgang Amadeus constantly composed. Symphonies, songs, sonatas, piano concertos, arias, quintets, quartets, trios and horn concertos. Financially, he was now very well off. He was even able to afford the rent for an apartment in Schulerstrasse, right behind St. Stephen’s Cathedral in Vienna, for 460 guilders per year – more than his father earned in an entire year. The former address Schulerstrasse 8 is not the Mozarthaus Vienna at Domgasse 5.

Mozart’s first child Raimund Leopold was born in June 1783. At that time, Wolfgang Amadeus also became friends with Joseph Haydn, a teacher and father figure for the young composer. Full of admiration, Mozart eagerly studied Haydn’s string quartets, saying: “It was only Haydn who finally taught me how to compose quartets.”

He was also constantly looking for new, interesting material for another opera, but nothing was in sight.

Mozart as Trendsetter: a completely new way of composing

One of Mozart's great achievements was to break with the contemporary way of composing operas. Everything that was already ‘on the market’ seemed too boring, too linear and too unrefined and unexciting to him. He constantly reworked every libretto and only a few libretto writers – such as Lorenzo da Ponte, who also worked for Antonio Salieri, or Emanuel Schikaneder – put up with this. Mozart had very precise ideas about what a libretto should look like and he was only content when text and music were in perfect harmony. This perfectionism was most certainly one of Mozart's most prominent character traits – and a foundation for the immortality of his unrivalled works.